...... but I know why after reading other postings. I used to receive all Freeview channels clearly, until I got the aerial split into 3. I understand that this has weakened the signal to the point that no inside aerial connection can recognise the Kordia mux.

So, how can I achieve a 3 way split? Do I need to have 3 cables from the aerial? Some kind of signal booster? Or is it not possible to do this?

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Hiya 

Often a 24db Gain Low Noise figure   Mast Head amp can be a big  help 

or a better antenna and feeder (  or all 3  in my case ) !!

Hi Elizabeth,

Depending on the brand and type of splitter you fitted, a three way splitter will take 10 to 20 Db signal strength out of your system, so you need to fit an amplifier into the system to regain that 10 to 20 Db you lost.

A bigger aerial does increase the incoming signal ("larger gain"), but that would probably only give you another 6 to 10 Db over the top of your current aerial's gain - not enough to totally replace the splitter.

There are two different types of amplifier:- A Masthead amplifier and a Distribution amplifier.

A Masthead Amplifier is used if the signal is weak at the aerial, and has two parts - the amplifier on the roof just below the aerial, and a power supply plugged into a wall socket and TV outlet inside the house; (but not at just any TV outlet - that cable must be connected to a "power-pass" leg of the splitter so that the voltage from the power supply can pass up to the amplifier.) As Steve J said, a 24Db amplifier should suffice.

A Distribution Amplifier is used when you have a good strong signal into the house, but then want to "distribute" it around the house to several outlets. Many of them have two or four outputs on them, saving the use of a splitter also; (called a "splitter/amp").

In some weak signal areas, we often actually fit both.

In your case, a distribution amp would probably work, (about a 15 to 18 Db model) if you were getting a good continuous reception on one TV before you split the signal. But it would obviously have to be fitted BEFORE the splitter (or instead of it). So if the splitter is in the lounge behind the TV, then that would also be your easiest option.

But if the splitter is under the house, or in the ceiling, then you will have to fit a masthead amplifier; (unless you have a power point in the ceiling!).

I hope that clears it all up for you and helps you decide which type of amplifier is best for your situation.

Cheers,    Bill.

Thanks Bill,

You have explained the solution well. It seems that a distribution amplifier is the way to go, however you say "if the splitter is under the house, or in the ceiling, then you will have to fit a masthead amplifier". Well, my splitter IS under the house - can you explain why that means I HAVE to fit a masthead? I have available power next to the incoming cable under the house - doesn't that just mean I need to be able to access that power? 

If I understand correctly, to install a distribution amplifier under the house, I need a power outlet (for the amp), and the amp installed before the splitter? Is that correct?

Cheers
 
Bill McMurray said:

Hi Elizabeth,

Depending on the brand and type of splitter you fitted, a three way splitter will take 10 to 20 Db signal strength out of your system, so you need to fit an amplifier into the system to regain that 10 to 20 Db you lost.

A bigger aerial does increase the incoming signal ("larger gain"), but that would probably only give you another 6 to 10 Db over the top of your current aerial's gain - not enough to totally replace the splitter.

There are two different types of amplifier:- A Masthead amplifier and a Distribution amplifier.

A Masthead Amplifier is used if the signal is weak at the aerial, and has two parts - the amplifier on the roof just below the aerial, and a power supply plugged into a wall socket and TV outlet inside the house; (but not at just any TV outlet - that cable must be connected to a "power-pass" leg of the splitter so that the voltage from the power supply can pass up to the amplifier.) As Steve J said, a 24Db amplifier should suffice.

A Distribution Amplifier is used when you have a good strong signal into the house, but then want to "distribute" it around the house to several outlets. Many of them have two or four outputs on them, saving the use of a splitter also; (called a "splitter/amp").

In some weak signal areas, we often actually fit both.

In your case, a distribution amp would probably work, (about a 15 to 18 Db model) if you were getting a good continuous reception on one TV before you split the signal. But it would obviously have to be fitted BEFORE the splitter (or instead of it). So if the splitter is in the lounge behind the TV, then that would also be your easiest option.

But if the splitter is under the house, or in the ceiling, then you will have to fit a masthead amplifier; (unless you have a power point in the ceiling!).

I hope that clears it all up for you and helps you decide which type of amplifier is best for your situation.

Cheers,    Bill.



Elizabeth said:

Thanks Bill,

You have explained the solution well. It seems that a distribution amplifier is the way to go, however you say "if the splitter is under the house, or in the ceiling, then you will have to fit a masthead amplifier". Well, my splitter IS under the house - can you explain why that means I HAVE to fit a masthead? I have available power next to the incoming cable under the house - doesn't that just mean I need to be able to access that power? 

If I understand correctly, to install a distribution amplifier under the house, I need a power outlet (for the amp), and the amp installed before the splitter? Is that correct?

 

Hi Elizabeth,

Yes, you are correct in your understanding.

My statement that "If the splitter is under the house, you will have to fit a masthead amp" was simply based on:-

1.  The fact that most houses don't have a power point under the house, or at the point where the cable goes under the house to the splitter.

2.  Distribution amps are not designed for external use (like masthead amps are) so must be installed in a dry enclosed area.

So, if your situation meets those criteria, go for it.

Cheers,    Bill.

All fixed! Installed a "Matchmaster" Digital Distribution Amplifier and power supply under the house (in the dry) and reception to all Freeview channels is restored.

Thanks for the help & advice. Cheers, Elizabeth

I realize this is an old post but it is exactly the problem I have.

Basically  I have freeview (terrestrial) but prime (and other channels in that group) reception is terrible. Constantly glitching out. I have a three way splitter in the system,  but if I remove that the reception on these channels is stable on the one tv that remains connected.

From what I have read above and in numerous other forums a Kingray MDA-20U distribution (although it has masthead distribution in the title...confusing) would be the way to go? It would go in the ceiling before the splitter and be powered from an insertor behind the TV. I do not have power in the ceiling. Would this work? Thank you very much in advance.

P.S The TV signal meter shows quality 100% and strength 17. It is much better without the splitter. I am in Kapiti

Masthead amp should probably help but needs to be located as close to the antenna as possible rather than in the roof space. The splitter could be located anywhere and the power is usually injected near the TV set. You would need to make sure that at least one leg of the splitter has DC passthrough for the power. Another option is to try separate antenna for each TV. I'd be more inclined to go for multiple antennae. Maybe 2 TV off one antenna and third of another even might work? Ideally it's worth getting in a pro with the proper gear to advise best option and correct antenna/amp/splitter.

Thanks for that. Yes the splitter is pass through on all ports. The amp is obviously the easier method but the multiple antenna option may be an answer. I've asked a few installers locally and everyone has different answers. Interesting. Frustrating. Thanks for your help.

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